Our Work in Jharkhand

The JH-RESET  (Jharkhand State РRoadmap for Ecological and Sustainable Energy Transformation) Project led by Swaniti Initiative deals with the various models of a sustainable transition through small and large-scale measures that have worked or has the potential to work in the mining-affected regions of India through collaborative partnerships of the government, private entities and communities at large.

The Problem

Our Solutions

Our Impact

Market access challenges and supply-chain issues, combined with few options for storage and preservation of fresh produce, leads to significant crop waste and lower incomes for many smallholder farmers across the state.

Solar-powered cold storage units allow farmers to preserve fresh produce until it gets to market. Solar-powered dryers allow farmers to dehydrate produce, which can be sold at a higher price and improve revenues.

Our pilot study demonstrated a 20% reduction in food waste and a 30% increase in farmer wages, earnings of 3000-4000 INR per dryer per month. 

We have leveraged these results and ensured funding for solar dryers in the State Action Plan of the Horticulture Directorate.

Additional INR Earned Per Month Per Solar Dryer

%

Increase in Farmer Wages by Selling Dried Produce Instead of Fresh

%

Reduction in Crop Waste When Using Solar-Powered Cold Storage

The Problem

Our Solutions

Our Impact

Many smallholder farmers across the state depend on growing and selling traditional food crops, which puts them more at risk from the effects of climate change and nets a lower return on their labor. 50% of the agricultural GDP in the state comes from horticulture and livestock.

Diversifying from low-value agriculture to high-value horticulture is one of the best alternative land-use systems for improving the financial livelihoods of smallholder farmers and provides year-round work compared to seasonal crop production.

Skills development workshops and Training of Trainers were conducted with District Horticulture Officers and scientists from agriculture extension centers from all 24 districts in the state. Standardized curricula were developed for replication by the Directorate of Horticulture in subsequent capacity-building workshops.

District Horticulture Officers Trained

Scientists from KVK Agriculture Extension Centers Trained

Farmers and Traders Consulted on Local Issues and Solutions

The Problem

Our Solutions

Our Impact

Coal mines are negatively impacting the environment through pollution and underground fires. The majority of mine workers lack skillsets needed for engineering or managerial positions are are only employed as day labourers or contract workers, meaning they are underpaid and lack job security.

Inadequate safe and secure employment opportunities are exacerbated by the huge influx of migrant workers returning to the state due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We have developed and delivered recommendations for strengthening employment exchanges for green companies, improving their ability to hire skilled workers and increasing investment in the state.

Government and private sector companies have been brought to a common platform to collaborate on recruitment, training, and career counseling. Ongoing conversations are being held with green companies to expand their presence in the state.

Concerns of private sector companies have been alleviated through stronger employment exchanges.

Recommendations have been adopted by the Directorate of Employment, focusing on improving awareness and mobilization, outreach, skill training, and digitization.

Four green companies have been brought on to collaborate with the State Government and ongoing talks are continuing with six additional companies.

Recommendations Adopted by Directorate of Employment

Beneficiary households reached

Green Companies Targeted for Increased Investment in the State